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“Nature, Mr. Allnutt, is what we are put in this world to rise above.”

TheAfricanQueenAmber's Tea Party Rules

~ March 18, 2017

 

“The final key to the way I promote is bravado. I play to people’s fantasies. People may not always think big themselves, but they can still get very excited by those who do. That’s why a little hyperbole never hurts…I call it truthful hyperbole. It’s an innocent form of exaggeration — and a very effective form of promotion.” ~The Art of the Deal, by Donald Trump

 

T

he word is out: Trump lies. The New York Times, in January of 2017, stated on the front page that “Trump Repeats anLiar Election Lie.” Chuck Todd of MSNBC called out Trump for “falsehoods.” And Bernie Sanders has recently tweeted that: “The United States will not be respected or taken seriously around the world if @realDonaldTrump continues to shamelessly lie.” President Trump, liar.

She’s offended...“A prominent U.S. senator just described the president of the United States as a frequent and ‘shameless’ liar, a claim that for reasons I'll explain is difficult to prove.”

Well, Amber Phillips of the Washington Post is having none of this (read her article). In particular, she’s offended that Sanders, a US Senator, is calling the president a liar. “A prominent U.S. senator just described the president of the United States as a frequent and ‘shameless’ liar, a claim that for reasons I'll explain is difficult to prove.” She’s concerned, it seems, with the dignity of the presidency, which is exactly what Sanders is worried about. While Sanders wants to protect the office of the president by curbing the outrageous and damaging statements made by its current occupant, Phillips takesAmberPhillips the exact opposite approach. She doesn’t want anyone to call him a liar, because doing so breaks the rules of proper decorum. “There are no rules right now in politics about what you can/can't or should/shouldn't say.” She calls out Democrats for calling Trump a liar, but says that “we in the media” can’t use the ‘L’ word.

Why not? “Here's the problem with using the ‘L’ word in politics, though” Phillips continues. “To say someone's lying suggests that you know they don't believe what they're saying.” In other words, you never can know another person’s state of mind, so you cannot be sure that the person is dissembling. She is being a humble and diligent and skeptical reporter, it would seem. If we can’t be sure, then we can’t say so.

“I play to people’s fantasies,” Trump confides to us. When someone admits to using “hyperbole” to stoke very dangerous “fantasies,” this is called lying, pretty much everywhere...

There’s something of a cucumber-sandwich, fancy garden party-manner about her article. Yes, Trump is a human blow-torch, spewing hate and fear, but we, we in the media, shall transcend the situation. As the lady once said: “Nature, Mr. Allnutt, is what we are put in this world to rise above.” And Mr. Trump is a force of nature.

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Here’s the problem—we have a pretty good idea that Trump isn’t all that gullible. Observe the quotation at the head of this article. The guy flings “hyperbole” and “exaggeration” like a turbo-charged manure-spreader. He knows how to fire up the imaginations of the rubes. Saying that Mexican men in this country are a bunch of rapists, you know, that’s “truthful hyperbole.” Wink. “I play to people’s fantasies,” Trump confides to us. When someone admits to using “hyperbole” to stoke very dangerous “fantasies,” this is called lying, pretty much everywhere, even at garden parties.

Is Phillips not a reporter? Is the Post not a newspaper? Do we not know this guy? By Phillips’ definition, we can never say lie, because we simply cannot plumb the depths of our fellow humans. But when we stare at a half-filled park in Washington, or find no footage of dancing Muslims in New Jersey, we know that the jibber-jabber is untrue, is false, and yes, is a lie. There are different kinds of lies—you can fabricate something from thin air, or you can misunderstand something and then pretend you didn’t. You can say that something you wish to be true, is true—and that’s a lie and would be called a lie by anyone, pre-Trump. He’s talking bullshit, and he’s gob-smacked and hyperbolized some members of the press into a mental daze. Put down your cucumber sandwich, Amber, and start doing your damn job.

(Watch Mike Figueroa’s Humanist Report on this story, which includes Bernie’s rebuttal.)

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